An up-close image of light and dark green mulberry silk lace weight yarn.

Everything You Need To Know : Mulberry Silk Fingering Weight Yarn

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Written by Kate Curry

What is Mulberry Silk Fingering Weight Yarn

One of our newer yarns, the mulberry silk yarn has found itself at the top of everyone’s wish list for different reasons. The texture, the colors, the durability- you name it, the mulberry yarn has it! 

An up-close image of light and dark green mulberry silk lace weight yarn.

In China, thousands of years ago, farmers noticed that silk made from the cocoons of worms that ate from the Morus Alba tree (also known as the white mulberry tree)  was softer, stronger, and had a more uniform appearance than other types of silk. The evolution of the silk harvesting led to high demand for their new product, known as mulberry silk. 

Tips & Tricks

A hand holding a skein of dark purplish grey mulberry lace weight silk yarn.

The next thickness up from 0-Lace weight, mulberry silk yarn can be a little tricky for first time crafters. But the buttery texture and smooth finish make it worth your while! 

  • Length/Weight: 250 yards/ 50 grams
  • Yarn Weight: 1- Fingering
  • Yarn Material: Mulberry Silk
  • Needle Size: US 1-3 (2.25 - 3.25mm)
  • Hook Size: US D-G (3.25 - 4.25mm)
  • Gauge: K- 27-32 /4", C- 21-32 /4"
  • How to clean: Hand wash, lay flat to dry

Pros

  • Gorgeous colorways 
  • Smooth, silky texture 
  • Durable 
  • Slides nicely on hooks and needles 
  • Great for crafters who are allergic to wool and other fibers 

Cons

  • Thin, could be a little difficult for first time crafters 
  • At this time, we only have 3 colorways 
  • Larger projects take a long time to work up

What Can I Make With Mulberry Silk Fingering Weight Yarn?

  • Shawls 
  • Hats 
  • Doilies
  • Lightweight sweaters 
  • Cardigans 
  • Tops
  • Cowls
  • Socks 
  • Scarves 

Inspiration

Crafts & Tutorials

How To Crochet Leaves

Meet the Author

Profile picture of the author, Kate Curry, wearing a dark red Nanda Poncho sitting on concrete stairs in front of brick wall.

Kate has been on the Darn Good Yarn team since 2018.

They have their degree in Creative Art Therapy & Psychology - and like crafting and animals a little too much.